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Sunday, 23 July 2017 23:30

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Sunday, 23 July 2017 23:26

Terms of Use

Terms of Use

1. Copyright

Copyright in material contained on this website is owned by the Vinyl Council of Australia ("Vinyl Council") unless otherwise indicated. The Vinyl Council authorises you to copy, download and/or print any material published by the Vinyl Council on this website for non-commercial use only, provided that such material is not edited or modified and retains all copyright and other proprietary notices, including any disclaimer contained thereon.

The Vinyl Council authorises Vinyl Council of Australia members, unless otherwise indicated, to copy, download and/or print any material published by the Vinyl Council placed on this website for commercial use, provided that such material is not edited or modified and retains all copyright and other proprietary notices, including any disclaimer contained thereon.

2. Trademarks

All trademarks, logos, images, product and company names referred to in this website are the property of their respective owners.

3. Disclaimer

The materials on this website are provided "as is" and without warranties of any kind either express or implied to the fullest extent permissible pursuant to the laws of Victoria, Australia. The Vinyl Council disclaims all warranties, express or implied, including, but not limited to, implied warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose.

The Vinyl Council makes no claim as to the accuracy of the content contained on this website. The Vinyl Council does not accept liability for any information or advice provided on the website or incorporated into it by reference.

The Vinyl Council does not accept any liability for loss or damages incurred by any person as a result of reliance placed upon the content of this website or any other information incorporated by reference.

 The Vinyl Council makes no representation as to the accuracy of any other aspect of the information contained on servers linked to this website via hyperlinks from this website.

 The information on this website is provided on the basis that all persons accessing the website undertake the responsibility for assessing the accuracy of its content and that they rely on it entirely at their own risk.

4. Applicable Law

This website is to be construed in accordance with, and is governed, by the laws of Victoria, Australia. By using this website you submit to the jurisdiction of the courts of Victoria in relation to any dispute relating to the website.

5. Update Notice

This website was last updated December 2018

6. Hyperlink Notice

The Vinyl Council of Australia provides external links for your convenience ("Links"). Whilst the Council has used reasonable endeavours to review the Links, the Council is not responsible for the accuracy, legality or decency of material located at the Links, nor is the Council responsible for the copyright compliance of the Links.

 

Sunday, 23 July 2017 23:19

Privacy Statement

Internet Privacy Policy

1.    Introduction

This web site is owned and operated by the Vinyl Council of Australia (“VCA”, "We", "our", "us") and this is our Internet Privacy Policy. Although the Privacy Act 1988 (Commonwealth) does not apply to us, we are committed to respecting the privacy of your information.  

By using this site, you agree to the Internet Privacy Policy of this web site ("the web site"), which is set out on this web site page. This Internet Privacy Policy explains how we collect, store, use and disclose personal information we have about you.

Under the Privacy Act, “personal information” means information which identifies you as an individual or from which your identity can be reasonably ascertained (and regardless of the form of the information, and regardless of whether it is true or not). We recognise the importance of protecting the privacy of information collected about visitors to our web site, in particular personal information. This Internet Privacy Policy governs the manner in which your personal information, obtained through the web site, will be dealt with.
We reserve the right, at our discretion, to modify or remove portions of this Internet Privacy Policy at any time. This Internet Privacy Policy is in addition to any other terms and conditions applicable to the web site.

Our site may contain links to other sites. We are not responsible for the privacy practices or policies of those sites and recommend that you review their privacy policies.
If we decide to change our Privacy Policy, we will post changes on this page.

2.    What personal information might the Vinyl Council hold?

The Vinyl Council may hold personal information such as your name, job title, contact details, your professional history and/or any information you provided to us in feedback forms, emails, or in relation to our subscription services, surveys, or otherwise in relation to any transaction or correspondence you may have had with us.

Personal information about visitors to our site is collected only when knowingly and voluntarily submitted. For example, we may need to collect such information to provide you with further services or to answer or forward any requests or enquiries and we may keep a copy of that correspondence and relevant contact details. It is our intention that this policy will protect your personal information from being dealt with in any way that is inconsistent with applicable privacy laws in Australia.

3.    What does the Vinyl Council do with personal information?

Personal information that visitors submit to our site is used only for the purpose for which it is submitted or for such other secondary purposes that are related to the primary purpose, unless we disclose other uses in this Internet Privacy Policy or at the time of collection.

For example, we use personal information about you:
•    to assist in providing our services to you, or improving our services;
•    to assist us in responding to your query;
•    to communicate industry developments, scientific material and special events;
•    for our internal administrative, marketing, planning, issues management and research requirements;
•    or otherwise, for the purpose the information was provided to us.

Copies of correspondence sent from the web site, that may contain personal information, are stored as archives for record-keeping and back-up purposes only.

4.     Disclosure of personal information

The Vinyl Council will not disclose personal information about you to any person except on a confidential basis to agents that we use in the ordinary administration of our business (such as for data processing, printing or mailing), or otherwise, with your consent or if permitted to do so by law.  

We do not share, sell, rent, or trade personally identifiable information with third parties for their promotional purposes.

Third parties to whom we may disclose personal information include:
•    our member companies (for example to assist in responding to your query);
•    our service providers and professional advisors including IT service providers, auditors, legal advisors, print and mail houses, advertising agencies and marketing research advisers.

We take steps to ensure that our service providers are obliged to protect the privacy and security of personal information and use it only for the purpose for which it is disclosed.

Contacting us through the website and downloading our information is completely optional. This may include submitting your name, email address, address, telephone numbers, option on receiving updates and promotional material and other information. You may request access to your personal information at any time by contacting us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

At any time you may opt-out of receiving any communications from us (other than as required for the operation of our business, eg regarding payment of your account) by contacting the Privacy Officer at the contact details provided below.

5.     Direct marketing materials

We may send you direct marketing communications and information about our products and services that we consider may be of interest to you. These communications may be sent in various forms, including mail, SMS, fax and email, in accordance with applicable marketing laws, such as the Spam Act 2003 (Cth). At any time you may opt-out of receiving marketing communications from us by contacting us or by using opt-out facilities provided in the marketing communications and we will then ensure that your name is removed from our mailing list.

We do not provide your personal information to other organisations for the purposes of direct marketing (see also our use of cookies).

6.    Openness

You may request access to personal information we hold about you, or request that it be corrected, by writing to “The Privacy Officer” at the address below.


To ensure confidentiality, details of your personal information will be passed on to you only if we are satisfied that the information relates to you. A fee will not be charged for an access request, but you may be charged the reasonable expenses we incur (such as search and copying costs).

There may be instances where we cannot grant you access to the personal information we hold. For example, we may need to refuse access if granting access would interfere with the privacy of others or would result in a breach of confidentiality. If we refuse to provide you with access or correct the personal information held about you by us (in accordance with the Privacy Act), then we will provide reasons for such refusal.

7.    Complaints or concerns

Any questions about this policy, or any complaint regarding treatment of your privacy by the Vinyl Council, should be made in writing to the address below.

Our procedure for investigating and dealing with privacy breaches is to ascertain all relevant facts and correspond with those involved (including where relevant our members), reach a view as to the existence, scope and cause of the issue, and where relevant and appropriate, implement corrective or rectification measures.

Our contact details are as follows:
The Privacy Officer
Vinyl Council of Australia
1.02 Junction Business Centre
22 St Kilda Road, St Kilda
VIC 3182
Phone:    03 9510 1711
Email:    This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.    

8.    Cookies

When you visit our website we collect information using cookies, server logs and Google Analytics. When you visit our sites to read, browse or download information, our system will record/log your IP address (the address which identifies your computer on the internet and which is automatically recognised by our web server), date and time of your visit to our site, the pages viewed and any information downloaded. This information will only be used for the purpose of site analysis and to help us offer you improved online service. We may automatically collect non-personal information about you such as the type of internet browsers you use or the site from which you linked to our websites.

You cannot be identified from this information and it is only used to assist us in providing an effective service on our website.

You can configure your web browser to reject and delete cookies and block JavaScript; however, this will limit your ability to interact with the VCA online.

9.    How we handle email and "feedback" messages

VCA may retain the content of any email or "feedback" message that you send us.  Any personal information contained in your message will only be used or disclosed in ways set out in this Internet Privacy Policy.  Your message content may be monitored by our service providers or VCA’s officers for trouble shooting, compliance auditing and maintenance purposes or where email abuse is suspected.

10.    Web site security

We use a number of mechanisms to protect the security and integrity of personal information that you have provided to us via the this web site. Unfortunately, no data transmission over the Internet can be guaranteed as completely secure, so while we strive to protect such information, we cannot ensure or warrant the security of any information you transmit to us and you do so at your own risk. Once your personal information comes into our possession, we will take reasonable steps to protect that information from misuse and loss and from unauthorised access, modification or disclosure.

11.    Miscellaneous

In this policy “personal information” has the same meaning as under the Privacy Act.  References to “VCA” are to Vinyl Council of Australia (ABN 85 083 012 533), which has issued this policy.

This policy represents our policy as at 4 June 2014. We may change this policy from time to time.  Although we intend to observe this policy at all times, it is not legally binding on the Vinyl Council in any way.  From time to time we may regard it as necessary or desirable to act outside the policy.  The Vinyl Council may do so, subject only to any statutory rights you have under any applicable legislation.

 

Best Practice PVC Product Register

Best Practice PVC for AS/NZS 2053:2 2001 Conduit & Fittings and uPVC cable trunking systems:

 

Australian Plastic Profiles Pty. Ltd.
12 Cawarra Rd, Caringbah, NSW, 2229
Tel: 02 9527 8800
www.app.net.au

Current BEP PVC verification expires
19 March 2020

 

 

 

Iplex Pipelines Pty Ltd
Level 21 Tower B 821 Pacific Highway Chatswood
NSW 2067
www.iplexpipelines.com.au

Current BEP PVC verification expires
20 February 2020

 

Pipemakers Australia Pty Ltd
112 Landseer Street Acacia Ridge Queensland 4110
Tel: 07 3344 3377
www.pipemakers.com.au

Current BEP PVC verification expires
20 February 2020

 

Marley (NZ)
32 Mania Road, Manurewa, AUCKLAND
Tel: +64 9 279 2799
www.marley.co.nz

Current BEP PVC verification expires
21 December 2021

 Vinidex by Aliaxis BEST 2019 logo

Vinidex Pty Ltd
Level 4, 26 College Street, Darlinghurst NSW 2010
www.vinidex.com.au/

Current BEP PVC verification expires
20 February 2020

 PBF Identity grey backgd

Plastic Bend Fabrications Pty Ltd
14 Dream Haven Rd Epping VIC 3076
http://www.cableflow.com.au/

Current BEP PVC verification expires
09 June 2020

 

 

 

Nine companies in Australia’s PVC supply chain have been recognized for their excellence in product stewardship in 2016.

Of 44 Signatory companies to the industry’s PVC Stewardship Program, these nine achieved full compliance with all relevant commitments in the Program, including
•    Best Practice Manufacturing,
•    Safe and Sustainable Use of Additives,
•    Energy and Greenhouse Gas Emissions,
•    Resource Efficiency and
•    Transparency and Engagement.

The PVC Stewardship Program, overseen by the Vinyl Council of Australia, has driven continual improvement in the PVC, or vinyl, industry for the past 14 years.

Under the Program, companies commit to meet measurable targets and obligations that reduce the environmental footprint of PVC products in Australia, whether manufactured here or overseas. Companies are required to provide comprehensive reports annually and each is audited periodically by an independent third party.

Signatories are from all parts of the value chain including overseas resin producers, raw material manufacturers and suppliers, trading companies, product manufacturers and distributors.

“The requirements to be met under the Program are challenging,” the Vinyl Council’s PVC Stewardship Manager Ms Laveen Dhillon explained.

“Signatory companies must verify that they or their upstream suppliers meet stringent manufacturing standards set by the Program for raw material sourcing, as well as meet local manufacturing commitments such as in use of additives, or implementing energy and resource efficiency.  

“We congratulate the Excellence award winners for demonstrating leadership to others in the industry by achieving full compliance in 2016.”

The PVC Stewardship Program is well supported by the Australian vinyl industry. The Program is a vehicle for members of the industry to work together to advance the sustainability of the value chain and has been successful in changing how vinyl products are made today. In 2016, thirteen companies reported for the first time as new Signatories to the Program, indicating that there is growing interest in the industry in improving its footprint.

For the 2016 report, Ernst & Young conducted limited assurance in relation to the Vinyl Council’s 2016 Annual PVC Stewardship Program Progress Report including auditing the data submissions of nine companies.

Winners of the 2016 PVC Stewardship Excellence Awards announced at a Vinyl Council event in Sydney in late May include:
Australian Plastic Profiles
Australian Vinyls Corporation
Chemson Pacific
Deceuninck
Karndean Flooring
Pipemakers
Sun Ace Australia
Tarkett Australia
Vinidex

The annual report is to be released shortly. For more information visitPVC Stewardship Programor contact us atThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

The presence of plastic pipe is ubiquitous, but some might say its profile is low simply because plastic pipe is often out of sight, below ground or behind walls.

Yet plastic pipe connects Australia. It plays an essential and integral role in Australia’s built environment, the nation’s infrastructure, electricity transmission, agricultural irrigation, stock and domestic water supply and the mining and gas industries to name a few.

People who think plastic pipe is secondary to their lives might reflect on the fact that these products provide upwards of 85 per cent of the pipe infrastructure to major urban utilities for power and the reticulation of gas, water, and sewerage. The high proportion of plastic pipe and conduit in the delivery of these critical utilities reflects enormous confidence on the part of asset owners in the ability of these products to deliver long-term efficient performance.

But today, efficient performance is not enough. Given the widespread use of plastic pipes, it makes sense to ensure we better understand what we are dealing with.

Leading Vinyl Council and PIPA (Plastics Industry Pipe Association) member companies, Iplex and Vinidex, have recently published world-first product–specific Environmental Product Declarations (EPDs) for their entire range of plastic pipe products. What is an EPD and why did the companies make this decision?

In ourlatest article published in Sourceable.net, PIPA’s executive general manager, Mark Heathcote elaborates on the drivers leading to these two major PVC pipe manufacturers separately taking the decision to publish EPDs for all of their pipe products, how it benefits the construction process and what lessons other product suppliers may learn from their experience.

The presence of plastic pipe is ubiquitous, but some might say its profile is low simply because plastic pipe is often out of sight, below ground or behind walls.

Yet plastic pipe connects Australia. It plays an essential and integral role in Australia’s built environment, the nation’s infrastructure, electricity transmission, agricultural irrigation, stock and domestic water supply and the mining and gas industries to name a few.

People who think plastic pipe is secondary to their lives might reflect on the fact that these products provide upwards of 85 per cent of the pipe infrastructure to major urban utilities for power and the reticulation of gas, water, and sewerage. The high proportion of plastic pipe and conduit in the delivery of these critical utilities reflects enormous confidence on the part of asset owners in the ability of these products to deliver long-term efficient performance.

But today, efficient performance is not enough. Given the widespread use of plastic pipes, it makes sense to ensure we better understand what we are dealing with.

Leading Vinyl Council and PIPA (Plastics Industry Pipe Association) member companies, Iplex and Vinidex, have recently published world-first product–specific Environmental Product Declarations (EPDs) for their entire range of plastic pipe products. What is an EPD and why did the companies make this decision?

In ourlatest article published in Sourceable.net, PIPA’s executive general manager, Mark Heathcote elaborates on the drivers leading to these two major PVC pipe manufacturers separately taking the decision to publish EPDs for all of their pipe products, how it benefits the construction process and what lessons other product suppliers may learn from their experience.

At the Australian Nursing and Midwifery Federation's Health and Environmental Sustainability Conference on 28 April, the world-reknown Australian horticulturalist, Jamie Durie OAM met with representatives of the PVC Recycling in Hospitals program.

On learning about what happens to medical waste, Jamie, a vocal environmentalist, enthusiastically lent his support to encourage more hospitals to join the program.

He discussed with staff from the Vinyl Council, Baxter Healthcare and recycler Welvic Ausutralia how PVC medical products can be recovered from hospitals and the collected material recycled into a range of new products.

It was particularly fitting for Jamie that the recycled PVC is currently being re-used in products such as garden hose!

Watch Jamie's shortvideo messageabout the program.

To learn more about the recycling program, including thebusiness casefor implementing it, check out ourrecycling pages.

Over the past five years or so, some 95 healthcare facilities across Australia and New Zealand have started to recycle PVC medical products and other recyclables used in the delivery of healthcare services. The PVC Recycling in Hospitals program has been something of a world first – now being adopted in the UK, North America and South Africa - driven by passionate medical staff concerned by the growing consumption and waste of resources in the healthcare sector.

Our program has shown the enormous will of staff to do at work what they do at home – recycle. It has paved the way to recover and recycle other plastics and materials from healthcare. However, working with these hospitals to put systems and infrastructure in place to allow recycling has highlighted some challenges in the design of these buildings.

When it comes to hospital development, waste management is not a top design priority (nor should it be compared to patient comfort and outcomes), but as a building type, hospitals generate significant - and growing - volumes of waste: food, plastics, metals, glass, paper and cardboard. And this waste generation represents a sizeable operational cost over the building lifetime.

The World Health Organisation has found that high income countries like Australia produce over 3.3 kg of waste per bed per day, 85 percent of which is generally non-hazardous / non-infectious waste. A metropolitan general hospital in the US is estimated to produce a whopping 10.7kg per occupied bed per day of which almost 8kg is general waste.

In part, this waste generation has been driven by improved infection control which has led to increasing adoption of single-use, disposal medical products. Much of this is plastic material and 30-40 percent of that is PVC. These items, such as oxygen masks and tubing, fluid solution bags, bottles and containers, are treated as general waste in Australia, and have traditionally gone to landfill at a cost to the hospital.

Our older hospitals were not designed to cater for this growth in waste. As we found in developing the PVC recycling program, buildings had insufficient floor space for placement of bins in medical areas; lacked interim storage space for bins of collected waste and had loading docks that were clearly struggling to cater for the growing volumes of various waste streams. In one case, the depot ceiling height was even too low to allow entry of today’s larger waste collection trucks!

If healthcare facilities are going to meet commitments to waste management principles, they need to implement comprehensive systems to facilitate segregation of wastes at source in medical areas and the safe movement of waste through the hospital to the loading dock for transportation away from the site.

Under current Australasian Health Facilities Guidelines, a typical 14m2 dirty utility room – the largest specification - in a general hospital might have space allowed for just two 240 litre bins, one of which would probably need to be for clinical waste. If hospitals are to collect and segregate waste streams effectively at source i.e. in the medical area, then appropriate space is required for suitable bins: clinical waste, PVC, general waste, and other recyclable streams. This has been a challenge for virtually every hospital we have worked with.

It requires forward thinking design of safe and efficient systems for collecting, handling, storing, transporting, treating, recycling and disposing of healthcare wastes. This encompasses:

  • Location and size of waste storage rooms
  • Holding areas (eg dirty utility rooms) sufficient for segregated waste streams close to where waste is generated
  • Internal waste movement routes (separated from high people movement and sensitive areas)
  • Layout and design of loading docks with space for balers and compactors, recycling bins, waste treatment, hazardous waste storage, bin and trolley cleaning, transport access etc

As recycling of consumables in healthcare grows, this means planning up front as hospitals upgrade or are built new, estimating waste generation volumes, types of waste and the types and numbers of bins to accommodate it, as well as identifying the departments that will recover and segregate waste streams for recycling.

Design of sustainable healthcare facilities today has come a long way in terms of infection control and improving comfort and outcomes for patients. But let’s make healthcare waste management a carefully integrated part of that system to avoid the potential public health and environmental consequences of waste generation.

We live in a chlorine economy

We live in a chlorine economy. And, no, it’s not all about vinyl.

Yes, vinyl is composed of two simple building blocks – one of which is chlorine (the other is ethylene, from natural gas). But chlorine, which is based on simple salt, is used in a very wide range of products far beyond those made of vinyl.

Chlorine is a key building block in everything from automotive components to firefighters’ clothing. You can find chlorinated compounds in wetsuits (neoprene rubber from chloropropene). It’s used for everything from water treatment to erasers (thio-chloride curing agents used in some rubbers).

These sectors depend on chlorine chemistry: health care, transportation, building and construction, defense and law enforcement, and the food and water sectors all rely on chlorine derivatives and chlorinated chemicals.

Chlorine is versatile, and it plays well with other chemicals to create some pretty cool stuff. In fact, did you know that chlorine chemistry plays a role in components for wind turbines and solar panels?

It’s also part of the chemistry in aerospace components and high-precision lasers and environmentally friendly coolants. All these products rely on chlorine chemistry and the multitude of chlorinated chemicals and compounds.

Here’s some other items that rely on chlorine chemistry at some point in the manufacturing process:

  •     computers
  •     smartphones
  •     cosmetics
  •     mirrors
  •     window screens
  •     mattress covers
  •     blankets
  •     nonstick cookware
  •     sportswear
  •     golf bags
  •     artificial glass
  •     guitar strings
  •     bulletproof vests
  •     tires
  •     batteries

The Chlorine Tree, prepared by American Chemistry Council Chlorine Chemistry Division, shows the breath and scope of chlorine’s use and demonstrates just how critical the chemical is to manufacturing – and how it exists at the core of many products. Without it, what would you miss most?